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Why Heavy Lifting Releases More Growth Hormone

February 23, 2011 by  
Filed under Hormones, Muscle Building, Recent Posts, Training

by Mike Westerdal

aggressive-strengthOver the last ten years or so, there has been a marked increase in discussions about how Growth Hormone (GH) impacts muscle growth, boosts the metabolism and facilitates the burning of excess body fat. Growth hormone is a protein-based peptide hormone that is made up of 191 different amino acids.

It is synthesized and secreted by cells called somatotrophs that are located in the anterior part of the pituitary gland. Looking back at man’s development over the last few thousand years, it seems that GH developed as a means to maintain growth and lean body mass during those times when access to food was scarce.

As an anabolic agent GH functions similar to testosterone, stimulating muscle growth, enhancing recovery and increasing utilization of body fat as fuel. However, there are a number of different theories as to exactly how GH works its magic in the body.

Two in particular are among the most common theories discussed.

The first theory—referred to as the somatomedin hypothesis ¬—states that once the pituitary gland releases GH, it then travels to the liver and other tissues where it stimulates the synthesis and release of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs). This hypothesis makes the supposition that the IGFs then function to stimulate the endocrine system, therefore facilitating the outcomes associated with growth hormone.

The second common hypothesis is known as the Dual Effector theory , which states that GH itself has anabolic effects on body tissues and does so without the assistance of IGFs.

Although there are different thoughts regarding how GH actually impacts the body’s metabolism there are certain things that we do know for certain. First, production of GH is at its peak when we are younger. As our bodies age natural production of GH begins to decline. We also know that we have the ability to influence our bodies’ production of GH.

Various factors that impact the body’s production of GH include overall health, diet, activity level, weight training, sleep patterns, consumption of alcohol, prescription drugs and the use of illicit drugs.

Of these, training with weights—in particular, training with heavy weights—has among the most profound effects on GH production.

Muscles get bigger and stronger in response to the stress of lifting weights. The growth is the body’s attempt to prepare itself for the next time it is faced with the same stress (lifting weights) so that when it encounters the same situation again, it is less stressful on the body.

Muscle growth is essentially an ongoing process of stress and recovery. Over time, as you continually lift heavier weights, the body continues to adapt to the additional demand being placed on it, by growing more muscle. With this understanding, it only makes sense that the greater the stress (lifting weights) the greater the body’s response action.

Training with light weights invokes minimal stress on the body and consequently, requires little or no recovery response because to the body, this is a ‘no big deal’ situation that it is prepared to handle. With light weights, the body has no reason to add more muscle because the muscle you currently have can handle the demand.

But introduce heavy weights into the scene and suddenly, the body’s reaction is totally different. Lifting heavy weights puts the body’s systems on high alert, evoking a strong hormonal response. And herein is what drives the pituitary gland to produce more growth hormone. The key to maximizing the hormonal response is to lift heavy weights utilizing compound movements that simultaneously recruit multiple muscle groups.

Isolation exercises (and exercises performed on machines) do not provoke the same strong hormonal response. Good GH-inducing movements would include the deadlift, the benchpress and the squat. These are commonly referred to as the ‘big 3’ of bodybuilding and for a good reason. Each is a compound movement that involves multiple, large muscle groups. As such, these exercises—when performed with low reps and heavy weights—push the body to increase its production of growth hormone to enhance muscle growth and recovery.

The capacity of heavy weight lifting to drive hormonal responses has been documented by researchers . For example, in a 2008 study, researchers regularly measured hormonal levels in the blood of an elite, record-holding male weight lifter over a period of several weeks. They found that his serum hormone levels spiked considerably as his training peaked. So if you’re interested in boosting your natural production of growth hormone, you need to pick up some heavy weights and get moving. Check out the video below to see some serious weights being lifted!

heavy-lifting

References:

Daughaday WH., Hall K., Raben MS., et al: Somatomedin: A proposed designation for the “sulfation factor”Nature235:107, 1972

Green H., Morikawa M., Nixon T. A dual effector theory of growth hormone action.Differentiation29:195, 1985

Hormonal responses in heavy training and recovery periods in an elite male weightlifter. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2008) 7, 560-000

Research on SEX, TESTOSTERONE…and MUSCLE

August 12, 2009 by  
Filed under Nutrition, Recent Posts, Supplements

Research on SEX, TESTOSTERONE…and MUSCLE

Ok, here’s the question…

“Does $-ex actually LOWER testosterone…and your ability to build muscle?”

We all know that raising your “T” levels can DRAMATICALLY increase your libido as well as pack on layers of thick new muscle, right?

So is your “love life” holding you back from some KILLER gains in the gym?

I mean, what about the “old school” BOXING rule of not having $-ex the night before your fight?

Was it because it took the “lion” out of the fighter? Made him WEAKER?

Actually, this was a question that bodybuilding expert and “hormone enthusiast”, Jeff Anderson took head on.

And he’s the PERFECT guy for the job!

After all, Jeff’s best selling program “Optimum Anabolics” IS focused primarily on naturally increasing your body’s levels of Growth Hormone and testosterone (by as much as 1,000%!)

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But it wasn’t EASY finding an answer!
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After tracking down several endocrinologists and urologists, all of them just shrugged their shoulders and told Jeff they “didn’t know the answer”.

Sheeesh!

You’d think guys who are supposed to be experts in healing E.D. and low “T” levels would have at least a CLUE about this, right?

So Jeff dug deeper…

He called up a friend of his who is a a world-renowned researcher in hormone replacement therapy and after a long discussion, they came up with the DIFINITIVE answer…

YES! sex CAN reduce your “T” levels AND your muscle gains!

I’ll explain WHY in a second, but…

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Here’s what’s MOST important…
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I’m ALSO going to give you Jeff’s SECRET to not giving up your love life in order to have MORE MUSCLE!

Ok, follow along…

Testosterone is a VERY important hormone for gaining muscle.

You knew that, right?

Well in order for your body to optimize output, you MUST have enough of the mineral ZINC in your body.

Zinc is an essential nutrient for your internal “T-Factory” and your body uses it up very rapidly but doesn’t store very much in reserve.

Therefore, zinc must be replenished DAILY, but…

…our diets these days are naturally DEVOID of zinc due to our poor choices AND the degradation of our food supply from poor farming methods (don’t get me started!).

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But here’s the kicker…
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We men also lose zinc during SEX!

We lose up to 1mg of zinc for each “happy ending” we have…and even MORE while sweating (so sweaty sex is basically a “zinc SLAYER”! ;-)

Ok, so if you’ve been following along…

Sweaty $-ex = Zinc Deficiency = Low Testosterone Levels = Less Muscle

Ok, now the solution (and NO…the answer is NOT to stop
having sweaty sex! ;-)

First, testosterone is a “supply and demand” hormone so you’d
damn well better be using a program that triggers natural “T” release.

Actually, this is the entire basis of Jeff’s “Optimum Anabolics” program because he reveals a unique method for naturally increasing testosterone and growth hormone through what he calls “hormone triggering”.

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You can check out Jeff’s best selling “Optimum Anabolics” below:

=> Click To Become A “T-Machine”

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Bottom line, you MUST be providing your body with the “need” for more “T”.

That’s what Jeff’s program was SPECIFICALLY designed to do with his breakthrough “triggering” technique.

Fortunately, having more sex ALSO creates a “need” for more “T” so it’s just a matter of SUPPORTING your own natural production and Jeff covers this in detail in his book.

(BTW…feel free to use this excuse with your partner if things have been a bit “slow” lately – “Really honey! It’s for my health!)

Next, make sure you’re supplementing with about 15-25mg each day of zinc picolinate.

It’s best to take it at night on an empty stomach, right before you go to bed.

This will make sure you have adequate levels of the “raw nutrient” to optimize natural testosterone production…
…and of course, BUILD MORE MUSCLE!

By the way as you can tell, I’m a fan of Jeff’s Optimum Anabolics program, in fact you can see my testimonial on the page you’re about to read.

The before & after’s on his website PROVE that NATURALLY increasing “T” using his method WORKS…BIG TIME!

Go see for yourself at:

Click To Become A “T-Machine”